shark teeth

Phylum Chordata
Class Chondricthyes

(Scale bar is 1 cm)

Shark teeth are probably the most distinctive fossils found in marine rocks; nearly everybody knows what they look like. Sizes are quite variable, from nearly microscopic to 15-20 cm (6-8 inches) in length. The state of Georgia declared shark teeth to be the state fossil, despite the existence of much more distinctive and geologically important fossils in the Coastal Plain (for example, Periarchus pileussinensis).

Sharks' teeth are found in virtually all the marine rocks of the Coastal Plain. The particular specimens shown were collected from the Ocala Limestone near Leesburg, but they are also known from the Clayton Formation, the Nanafalia Formation, the Lisbon, and the Oligocene formations, as well as others in other parts of the Coastal Plain. Because the shapes have been very conservative throughout the evolutionary history of sharks, their use for correlation is virtually nil.

Shark teeth also occur in practically any marine or coastal sedimentary facies, because most of the animals that carry them are extremely mobile swimmers. Thus, their utility for environmental interpretation is also very limited.



RETURN TO CLAYTON FORMATION

RETURN TO NANAFALIA FORMATION

RETURN TO LISBON FORMATION

RETURN TO OCALA LIMESTONE

RETURN TO BRIDGEBORO LIMESTONE

RETURN TO OLIGOCENE RESIDUUM

RETURN TO TAXONOMY

RETURN TO FOSSILS HOMEPAGE