Chlamys anatipes

Phylum Mollusca
Class Bivalvia
(a scallop)

(Scale bar is 1 cm)

Most of the scallops of the southeast are morphologically similar and require good specimens and careful examination to distinguish from each other. Chlamys anatipes is one of a small handful that are very easy to recognize at a glance. The small number of square-shouldered ribs is in strong contrast to the more numerous, lower, and more ornate ribs of most species.

Scallops are unusual among bivalves in their ability to 'swim'. If startled, they flap the valves frantically, expelling jets of water that propel them in a long, arcing, jerky path away from danger. Because they live at the sediment surface, they generally aren't as useful as burrowing species for interpreting sedimentary environments.

Chlamys anatipes is only found in lower Oligocene (Vicksburgian or Rupelian) strata, including the Bridgeboro Limestone and the Oligocene residuum in Georgia.


AGE: EARLY OLIGOCENE

FORMATION: BRIDGEBORO LIMESTONE and RESIDUUM

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